Friday, June 26, 2015

Non-Surgical Voice Repair. Attention Vocalists, Producers and Managers!

  • Producers: Have an easier role with the well-trained artist who will not lose their voice during the production.

  • Managers: Save time, money and aggravation by your artists not cancelling their performances, tours and other appearances.


Let’s look at the recent related events:



Singer, Mariah Carey, who has recently been on tour in Japan, was embarrassing herself while literally losing her voice on stage singing off key and not reaching any of the high notes. Obviously, she needs some sort of voice repair before it will become irreparable.



Also, people who loved and cherished her before are now deeply disappointed and even some of them are quite annoyed, as she definitely has not lived up to their expectations.



So this is the question.



Why, neither her or more so, her manager, do nothing about it? Are they waiting for the time where a vocal operation will be inevitable? Why bring it to that drastic point? Who knows? I do not have an answer.


Let’s look at the situation of Chad Kroeger of Nickelback. He was recently diagnosed with an operable cyst on his vocal box.


I, personally being a voice specialist, knew for quite some time that there is something wrong with his voice, let alone his singing overall, which is definitely not up-to-par, (at least from where I sit). I knew that sooner rather than later, that he will not be able to push his voice around much longer.


As all musicians know, “no gig lasts forever”. Obviously, the refund for the purchased concert tickets has been already offered.


My question is still the same…



WHY have him and his manager had to bring it to this extent? Obviously, in this instance, everybody took a loss: The singer, the manager (management), concert promoters and the audience.



However, from the point of view of the audience, rather then to listen to the not-very-adequate singing, (to put it mildly), the audience should look forward to the new and recovered voice of Chad Kroeger, and hopefully attend some of his concerts in the not-very-distant future.



And lastly, Roger Daltrey: The lead singer of The Who.



He was ordered a vocal rest for his vocal cords, and thus rescheduled his Toronto tour and pushed it to December (to the great disappointment of my son-in-law, who happened to be a huge fan of the artist and the band).



The only problem I have with the doctors order to go on a vocal rest, in my opinion, will only help momentarily, but will never solve the actual vocal problem caused by wear and tear of the vocal cords and by not-quite-proper application of the voice which, in turn, drowned that voice in a much lower position which naturally prompts the artists to pull and push their voice out on the surface, while concurrently promoting the strain of the vocal cords.


So the problem has to be rectified by going to the source, addressing the cause and then by taking the appropriate measures to recover and heal that voice so it could last for, lets say, the next 50 years.



So the moral of it all is:

  • Artists: when you notice the change in your voice in the quality and range, don’t continue singing and performing, pretending that nothing has changed. It will only bring you to a deeper vocal trouble, which will be that much harder to repair and restore back to normal. 

  •  Producers: When you notice that your artist is not performing as per standards, please stop the role and address it to the artist. Please make him aware that he has to look into his voice and make sure that it is healthy enough to continue the recording production.

  • Managers: If you want to have your artist perform and tour and not cancel his engagements, please start managing the artist’s very instrument (the voice), and if you spot a problem, please address it right away, as in the long run, the artist and you will lose more in the future then you would gain momentarily.

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