From a "Vocal Impotent" (in a manner of speaking) to a "Vocal Casanova"...

 In a previous article titled "Vocal Impotence - In Need of Vocal Viagra?" I provided important points on how to use your voice correctly and properly. I also enlightened my readers on how to comply with the standards of professional singing, which is a very important variable. Most importantly though, I also highlighted the key actions on how to protect and also save one's voice from any vocal damage and thus avoid succumbing to (figuratively speaking) "vocal impotence". With that said, I also explained how to use, in a manner of speaking, "Vocal Viagra" in order to cure any existing voice problems and, nonetheless, assure that the sound of the voice will last longer and also will sound fuller and stronger.


In this article, I would like to talk about how to use your newfound or recovered 'instrument' (body and voice) in such a way that you will truly be able to "satisfy" any kind or type of audience... After all, figuratively speaking, you may have "taken Vocal Viagra", which, no doubt, solved your physical problems, but you, in reality, had only succeeded in just 'fixing' your 'instrument'...


The question then becomes... Do you actually know how to utilize the maximum capacity of your existing "instrument"?


And do you also know how to use it in front of the audience so that they would ask you for the encore?


Essentially, the moment you went from merely singing in the shower to singing on stage or singing in a recording studio for that matter, you have changed from someone who is solely singing for yourself to someone who is singing for other people.


There could be many reasons why you may have done this. One of them could have been a need to be the center of attention.


The other one, you may be wanted to share your musical talents with other people, or quite possibly, also had a desire to communicate your thoughts and feelings through your authentic performance to others.


Regardless of the reason, you most likely wanted to captivate the audience and leave them with a positive impression of your performance. It has been my observation that the most successful singers are the ones who know how to interact with their audiences in the same way that an accomplished lover does with his or her partner. It is for this reason that I have titled this article "From a Vocal Impotent to a Vocal Casanova".


The word "casanova" comes from the name of an 18th Century Italian writer, Giacomo Girolamo Casanova, who was reputed to be an extremely skilled and legendary lover. He knew how to please women like no other man and always left them begging for more. Historical records note that while he was basically average-looking, he, nevertheless, possessed exceptional charm, charisma and knowledge of lovemaking.


What does this have to do with singing or even any performance in general, you, my reader may ask?


A lot actually....!


Firstly, your goal as a singer/performer should not only be able to sing/perform for the audience, but, so to speak, "make love" to them through the use of your voice!


Secondly, you do not have to be the most talented singer or speaker (for that matter) in the world or have an extensive-octave range to make an impression, but you do need to know how to use what you have and infuse it with your own natural charisma and charm.


Needless to say, I am definitely a vocal coach/voice specialist, and most definitely not a sex therapist.


I think I can safely say that making love is about more than the mechanics of sexual performance necessary in order to produce a climax. It involves peaks and valleys, either gentle or more energetic movements, foreplay, teasing, kissing and the use of the entire body and not just the midsections.


Casanova was a great lover because he knew how to touch women, how to talk to them and needless to say, how to please them overall...


He also knew how to react to the way they were feeling both physically and emotionally and in turn, he responded accordingly to their needs and desires. You should approach singing performance the same way. Use your voice to "tease" the audience. Vary your voice by singing softly for some parts of the song and harder and more energetically for others. (Peaks and valleys are important because constant highs or lows are too much for the audience and will leave them feeling exhausted rather than elated.) Build a connection with the audience and vary your singing depending on their needs.


A song that perfectly encapsulates what I am trying to say here is 'Killing Me Softly' which was written by Charles Fox and Norman Gimbel and then was covered by The Fugees. The song was written from the perspective of a fan who is explaining how much she was touched by the singing of a person, needless to say, that she never even knew personally...


The lyrics talk about a "stranger to her eyes". She feels that he's telling "her whole life with his words" and goes on to say that she feels flushed and embarrassed because it's like the singer had found her "letters and read each one aloud". With that said, it's clear that she was able to identify with the lyrics of another singer, while the message was conveyed in a very intimate and authentic manner.


You can have incredible power over your audience and touch them very deeply if you use your voice in the right way. You can literally touch their soul and bring them to the heights of ecstasy if you really learn how to use your unique "instrument", and nonetheless, being able to produce the desire to communicate with your audience and really share yourself with them.



In essence, anyone can become a "Vocal Casanova" if they approach the audience as if they would approach an intimate relationship. That will happen only when the performer indeed, would like to "share" him/her selves with their audience and not only vocally, but physically and emotionally as well. In a nutshell, the ultimate goal for this type of singer/performer is to achieve a strong bond with the audience, then, in the final analysis, it will create an enduring and truly fulfilling relationship between the singer/performer and their fans.


Desire and Deserve!!

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The Inspirational Journey of Aubrie Morris (Up-and-Coming Singer/Songwriter of Pittsburgh Pennsylvania)

Case Study of our recent attendee of an introductory/exploratory voice repair session:

The Conclusion of the Year 2021: Accomplishments and Success vs. Challenges, Turbulence & Tribulations...