Sunday, January 31, 2010

Vocally Speaking - Pushing the Carriage Before the Horse?

Over 35 years of teaching and especially over the 26 years over running my professional vocal school, it never ceases to amaze me why people would embark on spending money to equip their rehearsal spaces with expensive PA systems, microphones, keyboards and what have you much before they know how to sing or sometimes even play. Moreover, the so called singers are going to expensive recording studios and paying for their vocal recordings which take hours upon hours as they the crafty engineers are trying to autotune it or melodyne it to death. I just received a client who was definitely at the end of her rope and already literally losing her high range and basically killing her vocal anatomy with every note that she was trying to embark on. Interestingly enough, she was referred to me by a reputable recording studio. Her sensible engineer probably felt that if she continues any longer she will run of her steam completely and he will run out of the technology means trying to save the project. In fact, the prospective student was very alert and smart and, prior to coming in to my studio, she was talking to my assistant in the reception area and revealed in that converation that she was fully aware that she did not quite know what she was doing in the studio and that something was definitely very wrong with her throat and her voice. Meanwhile, as the money was spent in that studio, she could not afford to start her voice repair course momentarily and postponed it for two months forward. Go figure!!! No doubt she will continue recording, drowning her voice deeper and deeper into her vocal box and will come back with an even more severe vocal problem two months down the road. How does it makes sense? The answer: BEATS ME!!!

1 comment:

  1. Wouldn't it be amazing if singers would invest in developing their voices FIRST??!!?!? It's truly remarkable...

    ReplyDelete

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